Queen Elizabeth I facts and information

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Queen Elizabeth I of England was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. Born Sept. 7, 1533 in Greenwich England. Died March 24, 1603.

By the age of 10, Elizabeth spoke several languages.

Queen Mary 1 put Elizabeth in the tower of London for several years under the threat of execution

Elizabeth suffered from terrible headaches

Nicknames: Glorianna, the Virgin Queen, good Queen Bess, the Heretic Queen

Elizabeth I kept England out of war for 23 years which was a major accomplishment.

Reign 1558 - 1603

Elizabeth I inherited the throne at age 25 in 1558 after her sister Queen Mary I, better known as Bloody Mary Tudor, died childless. Elizabeth I reigned for 45 years.

William Cecil was her best friend, Lord Privy Seal and chief minister. He devoted his life to Elizabeth and remained her faithful servant for 40 years. (ancestor of the current owners of Biltmore House)

 

Pictures

bell tower inside the tower of london

The Bell Tower inside the Tower of London. At 18 years old, Elizabeth was held prisoner in the upper room of the Bell tower while Elizabeth was questioned about her knowledge of plots against her half sister Queen Mary I.

elizabeth before she was queen

Portrait of the Princess Elizabeth (young Bess) at the age of 13

queen elizabeth I portrait

Gloriana Armada Portrait

 

Religion

Elizabeth I was a Protestant and considered a heretic queen by Catholic countries which never recognized the legitimacy of her throne. She was excommunicated in 1570.

It was in Elizabeth's best interest to be Protestant. To be a good Catholic, she would have had to step down from the throne of England. Due to the circumstances surrounding her birth and the question of legitimacy of her father's marriage to Anne Boleyn (Elizabeth's mother), her right to the throne was questioned and not accepted by the Catholic countries as well as Catholics who lived in Britain.

Quueen Elizabeth I was tolerant of others religion, and has been quoted as saying, I have no desire to make windows into mens souls.

 

Views on Men and Marriage

Elizabeth I exchanged promises of marriage for political favors. She never married.

After Henry VIII's death, Thomas Seymour, Lord High Admiral, tried to get Elizabeth as a girl, to marry him but she knew better. It was high treason for any heir to the throne to plan marriage without consent of the council. After Thomas Seymour was executed for treason, Elizabeth said of him quote: a man of much wit and very little judgment. end of quote.

It is thought that Elizabeth I did not want a man to rule over her because if she had married her powers of Queen would go to her husband.

It is also thought that the execution of Elizabeth's mother, Anne Boleyn, by her father when she was 3 and the subsequent execution of her cousin, Katherine Howard  (Henry VIII 5th wife) when she was 8 had an impact on her decision to remain single. After Katherine's execution, Elizabeth stated she would never marry.

Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester was master of the horse. It has often been thought that Elizabeth was in love with Robert.

Elizabeth's favorite after Robert Dudley passed away, was Earl of Essex, Robert Devereux, whom she had to have executed for treason.

War and the Spanish Armada

Phillip of Spain sent the Spanish Armada to destroy the Heretic Queen(Elizabeth I) after Mary Queen of Scots execution.

Spanish Armada was defeated and destroyed off the coast of England.

Succession

Elizabeth I never had any legitimate or illegitimate children so their was no children to inherit the throne of England. Elizabeth I never married and named James VI of Scotland as her successor. James VI was James I of England.

Related subject: Medieval Castles of Britain

Tudor England Government Policies

 

Sources:

Weir, Alison, The Life of Elizabeth IPublisher: Ballantine Books; Reissue edition (October 5, 1999)

Starkey, David, Elizabeth: the Struggle for the Throne, Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (December 4, 2001)