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Appalachia Folk Art Craft Center Asheville NC

The Folk Art Center of WNC is located off the Blue Ridge Parkway not far from the Asheville area which is in the North Carolina mountains..

The Southern Highland Guild corporate headquarters is the Folk Art Center On display at the Folk Art Museum are arts and crafts made in Southern Appalachia. The Southern Highland Guild maintains strict standards of quality on its members and only display members’ art craft at the Western North Carolina Folk Art Center. These arts and crafts are made from natural sources found in the mountains and hand crafted utilizing the natural talent of mountain folk born, raised and/or transplanted in the southern highlands. Many of these crafts were created to fill a need within the household or community, practical items such as pottery, baskets, quilts, wooden furniture, and cloth. Today, this craft is an art form.

Crafts Made from Natural Sources

Traditionally, hand made items were made from natural sources. Natural material was and still is inexpensive and readily available in the Appalachian Mountains. Many of the natural sources were animal pelts, cornhusks, clay, flax, deer antlers, wool from sheep, and beehives. These sources are on display at the Folk Art Center heritage in their natural state. Much of this craftwork was created to fill a need within the household or community. Deer Antlers turned into handles for baskets or knives. Wool and flax were woven into fabric for clothing and quilts. One of the Folk art patterns used in quilts is called "wedding rings". Cornhusks were turned into dolls to entertain the kids. Wood turned into walking canes and furniture. Pottery was formed by hand or thrown on a pottery wheel or potters wheel. This "old time pottery" is on display at the American Folk art museum located on the blue ridge parkway just outside of Asheville North Carolina.

Crafts on Display at the WNC Folk Art Center

The crafts on display at the American Folk Art Museum retain much of their natural characteristics. Handcrafted North Carolina furniture that was made from wood that came from the Appalachian forests still has the natural grain and knots found in wood. The natural grain gives the furniture a unique and distinctive rustic touch associated with the culture of the Appalachian Mountains.

Demonstrations of Craft Working

Demonstrations of craft working are common place at the Folk Art Center. You can pick up some tips, get craft ideas to make for unique gifts, or pick up some ideas for kids crafts.

Unique Gifts, High Quality

The Southern Highland Craft Guild sets standards of quality for all its members. In an age where mass production fills our everyday needs, crafts has become an art form and more importantly a symbol of quality. An example of a craft that has become an art form is quilting. Hours and perhaps years of tedious work have gone into the creation of these quilts. The quilts come to represent the heart and soul of the woman or women who contributed to its (quilt) creation and perfection. The necessity of quilting developed into an art form symbolizing pride, focusing on quality and representing the spirit of the individual creator. This is evident by many of the unique folk art patterns that come from the quilting experience. Handcrafted items make unique gifts.

Displays of Southern Appalachia Arts and Crafts

The American Folk Art Museum displays arts and crafts made in Southern Appalachia. The Southern Highland Guild maintains strict standards of quality on its members and only display members' art craft at the Folk Art Center. These arts and crafts are made from natural sources found in the mountains. North Carolina furniture, clothing, bedding, and baskets was created for practical purposes but eventually evolved into an art form. These Appalachian Crafts represent the pride and the spirit of the rustic culture of Appalachia evident by the many creative and distinctive folk art patterns.

Foxfire 8: Southern folk pottery from pug mills, ash glazes, and groundhog kilns to face jugs, churns and roosters; mule swapping, chicken fighting, and more are included in this eighth volume. more Foxfire Books